Speaking out for People with
 Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Status of Provisions in the Build Back Better Act

The US Senate has been unable to pass the Build Back Better Act as written. However, several provisions of the bill are likely to be brought before congress in existing bills, as new bills, as part of appropriations bills or continuing resolutions, or bundled together with other bills and passed as new legislation. We are tracking those efforts and will keep our members informed as they appear.

COVID-19 Hospitalization Form

Michelle Ballan, PhD, a professorat SUNY Stony Brook, created a COVID Disability Form to help all individuals with IDD communicate their needs in the event of hospitalization. This form is usefiul whether the patient is verbal or non-verbal.
If your loved one is going to the hospital with COVID-19 symptoms, you may fill out this form to provide useful information to his/her medical team.
Yu may download the form from SUNY Stony Brook, or through this link on VOR's website.

Your Legal Right To An Intermediate Care Facility

Right To Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICFs/IID)

Individuals who qualify for Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ICFs/IID)* under Medicaid have a legal right to such facilities for as long as they remain eligible and choose to do so. Despite a deinstitutionalization effort by those opposed to congregate care, the ICF/IID program remains a legally enforceable federal entitlement under Medicaid. States which have included ICF/IID in their Medicaid State Plans, but instead offer only Waiver services, are in violation of federal Medicaid law.

VOR's Abuse and Neglect Document

VOR's Ongoing Document:
 Updated October 3, 2019
 This document provides a bibliography of investigative media series, state audits and peer-reviewed research in more than half the states that detail systemic concerns with regard to quality of care in community-based settings for persons with developmental disabilities. Tragedies range from physical, emotional, and financial abuse, neglect and even death. Many of these outcomes are associated with a zest to move to a "community for all" vision people with developmental disabilities without adequately considering the ramifications of separating vulnerable people from specialized care and then doing away with a critical safety net (a/k/a deinstitutionalization). The lessons learned from more than 25 states should cause policymakers and lawmakers to take pause and recognize that a range of needs requires a range of service options.
 
 
DOWNLOADS: